NEWS: Dennis Whyte

Leigh Ann Kesler, MIT

VIDEO: Leigh Ann Kesler: Tracking erosion happening inside fusion devices

NSE PhD student, Leigh Ann Kesler who studies at MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center, dates her interest in fusion from an 11th-grade persuasive writing assignment. Inspired in part by her father’s interest in the potential of nuclear energy, she decided to investigate fusion.

Dennis Whyte, MIT

Dennis Whyte: Committed to caring

Professor Dennis Whyte has made community building a top priority and has made a significant impact in affecting positive change as the head of the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and director of the Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

Office of the Dean for Graduate Education

Monica Pham: Advancing nuclear power, empowering girls

When she was 16, Monica Pham mapped out her future. “My chemistry teacher was talking about how atoms could generate unlimited power,” recalls Pham. “I asked her what kind of person worked in this field, and when she said a nuclear engineer, I decided that’s what I wanted to be.”

NSE

High intensity fusion

MIT’s Alcator C-Mod nuclear reactor winds down — and defines its legacy on its final run.

School of Engineering

ARC

VIDEO: Breakthrough in Nuclear Fusion?

PSFC Director, Dennis Whyte spoke at the MIT Club of Northern California — Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of energy generation because by fusing two hydrogen atoms together into a single helium atom it releases enormous amounts of energy, yet represents a clean, safe, sustainable and secure form of power.

Dennis Whyte with BBC Horizons host Adam Shaw.

BBC highlights MIT fusion research for upcoming news program

Host Adam Shaw interviewed PSFC Director and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department Head Prof. Dennis Whyte about the laboratory’s current project, the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, and MIT’s new vision for a smaller, faster, less expensive approach to fusion research.

PSFC

Interior of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

Fusion Energy Sooner and Cheaper?

Dr. Dennis Whyte, the Director of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, showed that a series of scientific and engineering breakthroughs could enable fusion to become a feasible a power source faster and cheaper than anyone had thought possible.

American Security Project