NEWS: High field magnets

Dongkeun Park: Winding a way to future medical insights

Dongkeun Park has been instrumental in the Francis Bitter Magnet Lab's decade-long pursuit to build an 800 MHz high-temperature superconducting magnet for NMR spectroscopy, a technology that provides a unique insight into biological processes. After set-backs and other employment, Park finds himself continuing to wind and test magnets, as the project nears completion.

PSFC

PSFC Research Scientist Robert Granetz

3 questions: Robert Granetz on fusion research

In a recent talk at the MIT Energy Initiative, PSFC Research Scientist Robert Granetz discussed how using machine learning to develop a real-time warning system for impending disruptions in fusion reactors is bringing us one step closer to creating a stable, net-energy-producing fusion device.

MITEI

Kaylee de Soto: A game changer

Incoming freshman Kaylee de Soto arrived on campus in June to help the Plasma Science and Fusion Center explore explore options for the their education program’s popular, but dated, fusion video game.

PSFC

Julien Barber: Protecting magnets and the environment

Graduate student Julien Barber grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where average temperatures do not rise above freezing from November to March. It may not be surprising, then, that the he is currently keeping things cool at the PSFC, studying cryogenic methods of preventing superconducting magnets used in fusion research from overheating.

PSFC

High intensity fusion

MIT’s Alcator C-Mod nuclear reactor winds down — and defines its legacy on its final run.

School of Engineering

ARC, MIT PSFC

VIDEO: ARC — putting it together

Animation of the ARC fusion power plant assembly as designed by MIT graduate students and animated by MIT alumnus Ken Filar. This highlights the ARC strategy of modularizing the design to allow for easier construction, maintenance and repair of the fusion plant that produces 200 million watts of electricity.

ARC

VIDEO: Breakthrough in Nuclear Fusion?

PSFC Director, Dennis Whyte spoke at the MIT Club of Northern California — Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of energy generation because by fusing two hydrogen atoms together into a single helium atom it releases enormous amounts of energy, yet represents a clean, safe, sustainable and secure form of power.