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Plasma Science and Fusion Center

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 
 

Joe Minervini

Senior Scientist , Division Head, Fusion Technology & Engineering

Email: minervini@psfc.mit.edu
Phone: (617) 253-5503
Address: Room NW22-129
Related links: Fusion Technology & Engineering

Research Interests

Applied superconductivity, superconductor stability and AC losses, cryogenic heat transfer, helium fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, low temperature measurements, superconducting magnet design and development for fusion technology and other large scale and power applications.

Education

U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, NY: B.S. with Honors, (1970)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA: S.M. (1974) Mechanical Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Tehnology, Cambridge, MA: Ph.D. (1981) Mechanical Engineering

Biographical Sketch

Joseph Minervini is Division Head for Technology and Engineering in the Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Senior Research Engineer in the Department of Nuclear Engineering. 

Dr. Minervini has played a leading role in the development of large-scale applications of superconductors since performing graduate studies in MIT’s Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory in the 1970’s.  His work has spanned the range from laboratory research to management of engineering groups and large-scale projects pursuing advanced superconductor and energy technology goals.  He has worked on magnet systems covering nearly every major application of large-scale superconductivity including fusion energy, magnetic levitation, energy storage, power generation, magnetic separation and high energy physics as well as medical applications.

His present duties include spokesperson for the U.S. Magnetics Program organized under the Virtual Laboratory for Technology of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES).

In a major project Dr. Minervini served as Principal Investigator for the US ITER Magnetics R&D Program supported by the OFES as part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project.  ITER is a major scientific international collaboration among the United States, Europe, Japan, Russian Federation, China and the Republic of Korea.  A major achievement of the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) was the design, fabrication and testing of the Central Solenoid Model Coil, the worlds largest and most powerful pulsed superconducting magnet.

More recently, the Technology and Engineering Division has designed, fabricated, tested and brought into operation the superconducting magnet systems for the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX), a joint project of MIT and Columbia University, Department of Applied Physics.

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